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A Gunrun Project


The Waters Beneath

February 10, 2015
Foreign Policy

In May 2009, a truck rolled through the Sheikh Yasin camp in Mardan, Pakistan’s “city of hospitality,” where thousands of people had fled following one of the country’s military offensives against the Taliban.

If water was a scarce commodity to this refugee community, ice was a luxury. And it was worth fighting for: A single block could refrigerate whatever perishables the displaced had secured for their families.

Todonyang Plains

Turkana, Kenya
Balazs Gardi, March 4, 2014

The Turkana herdsmen, who live a semi-nomadic pastoralist lifestyle, struggle to cope with the harsh consequences of climate change in the arid northwestern tip of Kenya. Due to the reoccurring and prolonged drought grazing land in the region is diminishing leaving little to support the Turkana tribes.

Inanda Dam

Durban, South Africa
Balazs Gardi, November 7, 2013

The Inanda Dam was constructed in 1987 to provide Durban with drinking water. Heavy storms caused the nearly completed dam to fill prematurely, driving hundreds of families to run for their lives. By being forced to leave behind their land and livestock, many lost the only means to sustain themselves. Never compensated for their loss, these impoverished families continue to live in temporary shelters that were provided by the government twenty-six years earlier.

Bad Information

November 6, 2013
Amnesty International

Hundreds of oil spills occur in Nigeria every year, causing significant harm to the environment, destroying local livelihoods and placing human health at serious risk. These spills are caused by corrosion, poor maintenance of oil infrastructure, equipment failure, sabotage and theft of oil. For the last decade oil companies in Nigeria – in particular Shell – have defended the scale of pollution by claiming that the vast majority of oil spills are caused by sabotage and theft of oil.

There is no legitimate basis for this claim.