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A Gunrun Project


Cameron accuses foreign leaders such as President Gaddafi and President Assad of supposedly using chemicals on their own people as a justification for regime change, but he is doing precisely that here in Britain by forcing toxic, life-threatening fracking chemicals on his own people against the advice of his own chief scientist.

− Vivienne Westwood,

Fashion designer

We have to accept that there isn’t enough water for everyone to do everything they want anymore, if there ever was. We have to accept that all water users, including the environment, deserve a say in how to allocate the limited water we have.

− Peter Gleick,

President of the Pacific Institute

What California Can Learn From Saudi Arabia’s Water Mystery

Oakland, California, United States
Text by Nathan Halverson - Reveal, Photographs by Balazs Gardi, April 27, 2015

This article originally appeared on Reveal

A decade ago, reports began emerging of a strange occurrence in the Saudi Arabian desert. Ancient desert springs were drying up.

The springs fed the lush oases depicted in the Bible and Quran, and as the water disappeared, these verdant gardens of life were returning to sand.

Will Wadi Fukin Lose Its Water?

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine
Text by Daniel Tepper, Photographs by Andrew Lichtenstein, January 31, 2015

Home to around 1,300 Palestinians, the village of Wadi Fukin sits in a fertile valley close to Bethlehem, right along the border with Israel. Driving along the only road that leads into town, I’m taken by the sheer size of the nearby Israeli settlement, Beitar Illit, built just to the East. White stone residential towers housing over 45,000 Israelis rise above on the hills as my car descends into the valley. The buildings slide down towards the village, ending in a towering wall built into the hillside that looms above groves of olive trees.


Last Week the Capital of the Maldives Lost Its Water Supply

Male, Maldives
Balazs Gardi, December 9, 2014

A fire in Male’s desalination plant left roughly 130,000 residents without water in the capital of the Maldives.

Over the past decade desalinated water replaced stinky and salty well water and harvested rainwater so when Male Water & Sewage Company was suddenly unable to produce and distribute drinking water neighboring countries had to deliver hundreds of tons of bottled water emergency aid to ease the crisis.

Ashokan Reservoir

West Hurley, New York, United States
Balazs Gardi, December 7, 2014

Ashokan is one of the 19 reservoirs that supply 1 billion gallons of fresh water to the City of NewYork every day.

World Toilet Day 2014

Detroit, Michigan, United States
Balazs Gardi, November 19, 2014

Access to safe and affordable water is out of reach for way too many people in the United States.

Imagine that – even for a day – you lose the running water in your home to drink, cook, bathe and flush your toilet. In Detroit it is the everyday reality of thousands of families whose water has been shut off after falling behind in paying their bills.

Now the UN is intervening in Detroit’s water conflict. Could thirsty cities riot?

October 17, 2014
The Guardian

This intersection of poverty and water access brings to mind the “food desert” (an area underserved by grocery stores). Food deserts have created a public health paradox: without healthy food, the poor are more likely to be obese, relying on corner shops stocked with junk food. The difference is that when it comes to water, there is no alternative – fast food and sugary cereal might be the food desert substitute to fresh vegetables and whole grains, but there is no substitute for water.

California drought creates grim ripple effect

Central Valley, California, United States
Shoka Javadiangilani & Balazs Gardi in collaboration with MSNBC, August 8, 2014

“The very success of a person as a politician is dependent upon resources that come from the people that you give exceptions to” – Michael Machado, farmer and former California State Senator.

After traveling more than 2,000 miles across California, it’s clear that the state’s drought is mired in paradox with decades of water mismanagement and regional fighting. While cities – some of which never installed water meters – struggle to convince its dwellers to conserve, agriculture consumes 80% of California’s water.

Earth Day 2014

Oakland, United States
Shoka, April 22, 2014

Eight years before the first Earth Day, in 1962, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, a scientific book decrying the abuse wreaked on nature by chemical companies careless use of pesticides, fueled the start of the environmental movement.

Fifty-two years later, we still struggle to find harmony between our obsession over progress and nature’s capacity to keep up with this unbridled hunger. The question is whether all this advancement is necessary, or if it is simply a psychosis, a disorder we’ve let run wild far too long and that should be reined in before we lose our grip with reality.