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A Gunrun Project


We have to accept that there isn’t enough water for everyone to do everything they want anymore, if there ever was. We have to accept that all water users, including the environment, deserve a say in how to allocate the limited water we have.

− Peter Gleick,

President of the Pacific Institute

What California Can Learn From Saudi Arabia’s Water Mystery

Oakland, California, United States
Text by Nathan Halverson - Reveal, Photographs by Balazs Gardi, April 27, 2015

This article originally appeared on Reveal

A decade ago, reports began emerging of a strange occurrence in the Saudi Arabian desert. Ancient desert springs were drying up.

The springs fed the lush oases depicted in the Bible and Quran, and as the water disappeared, these verdant gardens of life were returning to sand.

Lay Off the Almond Milk, You Ignorant Hipsters

April 17, 2015
Mother Jones

The water-intensive nature of almond milk, of course, is no secret. By law, food manufacturers have to name ingredients in order of their prevalence in the product. For Califia and other almond milk brands, it starts like this: “filtered water, almonds.” Given that it takes 1.1 gallons of water to grow a single almond in California, where 80 percent of the world’s almonds are produced, drenching the finished product in yet more water seems insane.

Thanks to Drought, Spiral Jetty Back Again

Rozel Point, Utah, United States
Shoka Javadiangilani, December 23, 2014

Built by American artist Robert Smithson over six days during a drought in 1970, ‘Spiral Jetty’, a 1,500 foot long (460 meter) and 15 feet wide (4.6 meter) counterclockwise coil made of basalt rock and earth, juts from the shore into the pinkish colored waters of Utah’s Great Salt Lake.

California drought creates grim ripple effect

Central Valley, California, United States
Shoka Javadiangilani & Balazs Gardi in collaboration with MSNBC, August 8, 2014

“The very success of a person as a politician is dependent upon resources that come from the people that you give exceptions to” – Michael Machado, farmer and former California State Senator.

After traveling more than 2,000 miles across California, it’s clear that the state’s drought is mired in paradox with decades of water mismanagement and regional fighting. While cities – some of which never installed water meters – struggle to convince its dwellers to conserve, agriculture consumes 80% of California’s water.

National Climate Assessment

May 21, 2014
GlobalChange.gov

The National Climate Assessment summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, now and in the future.

A team of more than 300 experts guided by a 60-member Federal Advisory Committee produced the report, which was extensively reviewed by the public and experts, including federal agencies and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences.

Todonyang Plains

Turkana, Kenya
Balazs Gardi, March 4, 2014

The Turkana herdsmen, who live a semi-nomadic pastoralist lifestyle, struggle to cope with the harsh consequences of climate change in the arid northwestern tip of Kenya. Due to the reoccurring and prolonged drought grazing land in the region is diminishing leaving little to support the Turkana tribes.

Everything You Need to Know About the Texas Drought

July 9, 2013
StateImpact, NPR

The drought began in October 2010 and has continued through 2013. The state experienced a short and rainy respite in the winter and spring of 2012, but by the fall of 2012 dry conditions had returned to much of the state.

As of June 4, 2013, 95 percent of Texas is in some form of drought conditions, and the state’s reservoirs are only 67 percent full. About 16 percent of the state is in “exceptional” drought, the worst stage.

Drought and Poverty Pushed Indian Farmer To Attempt Suicide

Bundelkhand, India
Balazs Gardi, May 21, 2013

Unable to provide for his family, this man tried to hang himself after his wife left him, taking his children. He survived because his sister found and saved him in time. Drought in India, and competition with industry over scarce water resources, has driven thousands of farmers facing debt to commit suicide in recent years.