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A Gunrun Project


California drought creates grim ripple effect

Central Valley, California, United States
Shoka Javadiangilani & Balazs Gardi in collaboration with MSNBC, August 8, 2014

“The very success of a person as a politician is dependent upon resources that come from the people that you give exceptions to” – Michael Machado, farmer and former California State Senator.

After traveling more than 2,000 miles across California, it’s clear that the state’s drought is mired in paradox with decades of water mismanagement and regional fighting. While cities – some of which never installed water meters – struggle to convince its dwellers to conserve, agriculture consumes 80% of California’s water.

National Climate Assessment

May 21, 2014
GlobalChange.gov

The National Climate Assessment summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, now and in the future.

A team of more than 300 experts guided by a 60-member Federal Advisory Committee produced the report, which was extensively reviewed by the public and experts, including federal agencies and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences.

Todonyang Plains

Turkana, Kenya
Balazs Gardi, March 4, 2014

The Turkana herdsmen, who live a semi-nomadic pastoralist lifestyle, struggle to cope with the harsh consequences of climate change in the arid northwestern tip of Kenya. Due to the reoccurring and prolonged drought grazing land in the region is diminishing leaving little to support the Turkana tribes.

Drought and Poverty Pushed Indian Farmer To Attempt Suicide

Bundelkhand, India
Balazs Gardi, May 21, 2013

Unable to provide for his family, this man tried to hang himself after his wife left him, taking his children. He survived because his sister found and saved him in time. Drought in India, and competition with industry over scarce water resources, has driven thousands of farmers facing debt to commit suicide in recent years.

Colorado River flows through Las Vegas Casino

Las Vegas, United States
Balazs Gardi, May 19, 2013

According to researchers there is 50 percent chance Lake Mead, the nation’s largest manmade reservoir and a key source of water for millions of people in the southwestern United States, will be dry by 2021 if climate changes as expected and future water usage is not curtailed.

U.S., Mexico: The Decline of the Colorado River

May 13, 2013
Stratfor

Over-allocation of the river’s waters 90 years ago combined with increasing populations and economic growth in the river basin have created circumstances in which conservation efforts — no matter how organized — could be too little to overcome the projected water deficit that the Colorado River Basin will face in the next 20 years.

It Takes 400,000 Liters of Water a Day to Keep a Small Desert Golf Course Green

Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Balazs Gardi, January 4, 2013

Looking down from a helicopter parts of Dubai look just as green as pastures in Scotland. Golf courses connect the various housing projects wrapped with artificial lakes and landscaped gardens, the Greens, the Meadows, The Lakes, The Jumeirah Islands.

With an estimated 350 liters, or a little over 92 gallons, per person per day the United Arab Emirates’ water consumption is among the highest in the world. The water used to irrigate the agricultural fields and keep the meticulously maintained golf courses and public gardens green would at least double this amount.

Texas suing NM in water war

January 9, 2013
KRQE 13

Neither Attorney General Gary King nor Governor Susana Martinez are backing down.

“Texas is trying to rustle New Mexico’s water and is using a lawsuit to extort an agreement that would only benefit Texas while destroying water resources for hundreds of thousands of New Mexicans,” said King in a statement released by the AG’s office Tuesday afternoon.

“We are reviewing the Texas lawsuit and will decide how best to protect the water that is so vital to New Mexican families and businesses,” said the Governor’s spokesperson Enrique Knell. “We won’t cede a single inch of New Mexico water to Texas.”

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