show

A Gunrun Project


The Sweet Days Are Gone

Sharafkhaneh port, East Azerbaijan province, Iran
Solmaz Daryani, December 21, 2015

The relationships between places and past events shape human identity and provide memories that are a reservoir of pain and joy; they connect the chain of time between past and future. In addition to other characteristics, my place of birth, beliefs and ethnic roots all constitute a part of my identity.

California drought creates grim ripple effect

Central Valley, California, United States
Shoka Javadiangilani & Balazs Gardi in collaboration with MSNBC, August 8, 2014

“The very success of a person as a politician is dependent upon resources that come from the people that you give exceptions to” – Michael Machado, farmer and former California State Senator.

After traveling more than 2,000 miles across California, it’s clear that the state’s drought is mired in paradox with decades of water mismanagement and regional fighting. While cities – some of which never installed water meters – struggle to convince its dwellers to conserve, agriculture consumes 80% of California’s water.

Earth Day 2014

Oakland, United States
Shoka, April 22, 2014

Eight years before the first Earth Day, in 1962, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, a scientific book decrying the abuse wreaked on nature by chemical companies careless use of pesticides, fueled the start of the environmental movement.

Fifty-two years later, we still struggle to find harmony between our obsession over progress and nature’s capacity to keep up with this unbridled hunger. The question is whether all this advancement is necessary, or if it is simply a psychosis, a disorder we’ve let run wild far too long and that should be reined in before we lose our grip with reality.

“If there is one thing that I have discovered by studying the ocean, it is that it is greatly imperiled – it is treated both as humanity’s waste bin and its fast food joint”

− Ethan Estess,

Artist

Reclaimed Hummer and Whale Tail at SFO

San Francisco, United States
Balazs Gardi, August 25, 2013

I spent my excess time prior to boarding my plane en route to Boston as usual, catching up with emails at the business lounge. I only realized that I made a mistake this time when I passed by the current exhibition at SFO’s terminal 3.

Saving Water in City Schools Starts With a (Smaller) Flush

May 13, 2013
The New York Times

The new toilets send 1.2 gallons of water down the pipes each time they are used, a reduction from 3.5 to 4.5 gallons with the old toilets.

The new toilets are part of the Department of Environmental Protection’s preparations for the temporary shutdown of the Delaware Aqueduct in 2020. The 85-mile aqueduct, which carries water from north of the city, currently supplies more than half of the city’s public water but needs to be taken out of use for repairs, which may force the city to get water from more expensive sources.

“Plastic bottles have got to go. The bottles take so much energy to make, leach gross chemicals, and last forever. What’s convenient about that, man?”

− Jeff Bridges,

The Dude

NSW to cap water buybacks

January 15, 2013
Straight Furrow

From today, further water purchases for the environment will be restricted to three per cent per valley per decade, a more sustainable rate of purchase which will provide much needed breathing space and time for rural economies to adjust.

It Takes 400,000 Liters of Water a Day to Keep a Small Desert Golf Course Green

Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Balazs Gardi, January 4, 2013

Looking down from a helicopter parts of Dubai look just as green as pastures in Scotland. Golf courses connect the various housing projects wrapped with artificial lakes and landscaped gardens, the Greens, the Meadows, The Lakes, The Jumeirah Islands.

With an estimated 350 liters, or a little over 92 gallons, per person per day the United Arab Emirates’ water consumption is among the highest in the world. The water used to irrigate the agricultural fields and keep the meticulously maintained golf courses and public gardens green would at least double this amount.

Central Valley residents tire of receiving L.A.’s urban waste

March 25, 2012
Los Angeles Times

One of the most bitter battles in California is over sludge, the batter-like material left over after treatment plants finish cleaning and draining what is flushed down the toilet or washed down the sink.

Sludge used to get dumped in the ocean — but that was banned in the 1980s because of concerns about pollution.

Tijuca National Park

Brazil, Rio de Janeiro
January 6, 2013

Tijuca is a hand-planted rainforest and the largest urban rainforest in the world. In an effort to protect Rio’s water resources Tijuca was replanted by Major Archer and a handful of slaves in the second half of the 19th century after the original forest had been destroyed to make way for coffee farms.