show

A Gunrun Project


We have to accept that there isn’t enough water for everyone to do everything they want anymore, if there ever was. We have to accept that all water users, including the environment, deserve a say in how to allocate the limited water we have.

− Peter Gleick,

President of the Pacific Institute

Space Innovators

April 25, 2012
The Daily Show

Wealthy “spend-o-nauts” announce plans to mine asteroids for precious minerals, and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson reveals whether or not it’s bulls**t.

How asteroid mining could turn billionaires into trillionaires

April 25, 2012
The Christian Science Monitor

A cadre of Silicon Valley tycoons have announced plans to extract water and precious metals from near-Earth asteroids.

In addition to mining for platinum and other precious metals, the company plans to tap asteroids’ water to supply orbiting fuel depots, which could be used by NASA and others for robotic and human space missions.

NSW to cap water buybacks

January 15, 2013
Straight Furrow

From today, further water purchases for the environment will be restricted to three per cent per valley per decade, a more sustainable rate of purchase which will provide much needed breathing space and time for rural economies to adjust.

Tijuca National Park

Brazil, Rio de Janeiro
January 6, 2013

Tijuca is a hand-planted rainforest and the largest urban rainforest in the world. In an effort to protect Rio’s water resources Tijuca was replanted by Major Archer and a handful of slaves in the second half of the 19th century after the original forest had been destroyed to make way for coffee farms.

“Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes. Because of this, they have been observed to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bioaccumulate in human and animal tissue, biomagnify in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment”

− Wikipedia