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A Gunrun Project


Cameron accuses foreign leaders such as President Gaddafi and President Assad of supposedly using chemicals on their own people as a justification for regime change, but he is doing precisely that here in Britain by forcing toxic, life-threatening fracking chemicals on his own people against the advice of his own chief scientist.

− Vivienne Westwood,

Fashion designer

The Japanese town that was poisoned

February 11, 2015
BBC

More than 2,000 people died from eating contaminated seafood from the area, with thousands more suffered life-long damage.

It would take years before the Chisso Corporation admitted their role in the poisoning of the environment.

California drought creates grim ripple effect

Central Valley, California, United States
Shoka Javadiangilani & Balazs Gardi in collaboration with MSNBC, August 8, 2014

“The very success of a person as a politician is dependent upon resources that come from the people that you give exceptions to” – Michael Machado, farmer and former California State Senator.

After traveling more than 2,000 miles across California, it’s clear that the state’s drought is mired in paradox with decades of water mismanagement and regional fighting. While cities – some of which never installed water meters – struggle to convince its dwellers to conserve, agriculture consumes 80% of California’s water.

Earth Day 2014

Oakland, United States
Shoka, April 22, 2014

Eight years before the first Earth Day, in 1962, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, a scientific book decrying the abuse wreaked on nature by chemical companies careless use of pesticides, fueled the start of the environmental movement.

Fifty-two years later, we still struggle to find harmony between our obsession over progress and nature’s capacity to keep up with this unbridled hunger. The question is whether all this advancement is necessary, or if it is simply a psychosis, a disorder we’ve let run wild far too long and that should be reined in before we lose our grip with reality.

“My family is breathing horrible fumes, we can’t enjoy our property and we’re trapped because no one else wants to live here. To protect our homes and our health, we’ve got no choice but to ban fracking.”

− Maile Bush,

Denton, TX resident

Iran & South Asia #3: After US Withdrawal from Afghanistan

December 16, 2013
United States Institute of Peace

The two countries also have specific disputes, notably over water, illicit narcotics trade, and refugees. Water flows to Iran are likely to be reduced when major hydropower dams are completed in Afghanistan, and water sharing is becoming a more acute source of friction between the two states.

“A big international oil company is breaking the law because nobody’s looking. And taking economic advantage of the law by cheating”

− Tom Frantz,

Farmer

Bad Information

November 6, 2013
Amnesty International

Hundreds of oil spills occur in Nigeria every year, causing significant harm to the environment, destroying local livelihoods and placing human health at serious risk. These spills are caused by corrosion, poor maintenance of oil infrastructure, equipment failure, sabotage and theft of oil. For the last decade oil companies in Nigeria – in particular Shell – have defended the scale of pollution by claiming that the vast majority of oil spills are caused by sabotage and theft of oil.

There is no legitimate basis for this claim.

“If there is one thing that I have discovered by studying the ocean, it is that it is greatly imperiled – it is treated both as humanity’s waste bin and its fast food joint”

− Ethan Estess,

Artist

It Takes Roughly 40,000 Gallons of Water to Make a Car

Big Island, Hawaii, United States
Balazs Gardi, August 22, 2013

Each year roughly 16 million new cars are sold in the United States alone. The US is home to the largest car market of any country in the world with an estimated quarter of a billion registered passenger vehicles. Forty percent are less than six years old. It takes approximately 40,000 gallons of water to make a car.

Fukushima radioactive water leak an ’emergency’

August 5, 2013
BBC

Japan’s nuclear watchdog has said the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant is facing a new “emergency” caused by a build-up of radioactive groundwater.
Its operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco), has been criticised heavily for its lack of transparency over the leaks.
Tepco’s “sense of crisis is weak,” Shinji Kinjo, the head of a Nuclear Regulatory Authority task force said. “This is why you can’t just leave it up to Tepco alone”.

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